Now For Some Good News

IMG_20190526_153349.jpgWhew! Lots of bad news going around these days. But there’s plenty of good stuff, too. Starting with a recent cover from The New Yorker, I talk about tending the garden that is your heart.  I also share a personal story about my Dad and suggest a way that you can focus your good energy and really make a difference in the world. I even threw in a little green tip on mighty arugula. Take a moment and read the June issue of ACP Enews.

Here’s to making it a good news day everyday!

Illustration by Tom Gauld courtesy of TNY. 

A Man Crawled Into A Dumpster

43648586_10155067784098039_9207806800496164864_nSounds like a joke set-up but it’s not. Last month, I witnessed a guy get into a dumpster and close the lid. He didn’t come out. After 30 minutes, I called the police thinking what if he was sick, wounded, dying? Two squad cars responded within 5 minutes and he turned out to be none of those. But he was clearly disheveled, disturbed and in trouble. This incident weighed on my heart. How does one get to such a low point in life as to seek refuge in a dumpster? More importantly, what could I or anyone do to help? The mental health system continues to be overwhelmed. Police are getting special training in counseling and intervention. Street drugs have become the norm. Homelessness has arrived at our doorstep. So again, what can be done to help? I called back the police to thank them for their quick response and to ask what they suggest if a citizen wants to help in prevention or solution? The answer? 211. Ever hear of it? Me neither. Apparently, a lot of folks don’t know about it including my neighbors, my dentist, his assistant and pretty much anyone I’ve talked with in the last few weeks. 211 is the 911 for resources. Everything from suicide to abuse to hunger to shelter to senior needs and paying bills. It’s a clearinghouse for 50k programs and over 3k agencies across the nation and Canada. Anyone can call the 211 hotline and talk to an operator who is trained to listen and provide appropriate connections. Part of the 211 manifesto reads: WE BELIEVE in the transformative power of collective action. So do I. Please share this number. Visit 211.org to learn more about services and volunteering opportunities in your local community. Shine the light!

Here’s the Facebook page for the Oregon area.

Sustainability Fair

sustainability+website.jpgJoin me Friday the 12th for a FREE and fun event. This 8th Annual Sustainability & Repair Fair brings a great group of folks together at the Garden Home Library in SW Portland. Lots of earth friendly products and information. You can even get your toaster fixed while you visit with vendors. Note: You can bring up to 2 items for repairs but they ask for a heads up. Click here for the Repair Fair registry. This event is so popular they now have to hold it in the adjacent gymnasium to accommodate everyone. And that’s a good thing! 5 to 7:30 pm. Corner of Oleson & Garden Home Rd. See you then!

Briar Patch is A Clear Winner

IMG_20180531_212105.jpgIt’s always a treat to discover a business that is authentic and clear in it’s purpose. Newly opened Briar Patch Herbs in SW Portland is such a place and I’m delighted to announce it as the latest A Clear Place Winner for entrepreneurial spirit. From the extensive inventory of organic herbs to its repurposed wood shelves and tree decor, the shop exudes healing Earth energy. You’ll find highly regarded Floracopeia products along with a commitment to showcasing quality local vendors. Owner Sheri Copans is passionate about herbs and happily offers suggestions for both newbies and seasoned shoppers. Clearly the stars have aligned to bring this refreshing herbal oasis to the neighborhood. Congrats Briar Patch and here’s to a rewarding and enriching experience for all! Check out my review of Briar Patch Herbs on Google Maps: https://goo.gl/maps/8DteXJUwpdG2

 

The Clear Gift of Humor

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SPLASH, Eugene Levy, 1984, (c)Buena Vista Pictures

What a week I’m having! If 2017 has been as full of angst for you as it has been for most of us, you’ll enjoy the suggestions in my December Enews. This issue features a nod to laughter, seasonal donation opportunity, help from a fellow blogger, favorite product tip and a first time offer for 30% OFF A Clear Place Wisdom Cards. Here’s to lightening the load with humor … and a bright holiday for all! View the good stuff now.

Solution for Styrofoam Scourge

Styrofoam (1)The waste industry has made major strides in coming up with ways to recycle our refuse. Everything that is except those ginormous blocks of Styrofoam. You know the ones – hermetically sealing everything from flat screen TV’s to furniture and glassware. Even if you break them down into tiny pieces, the choice for disposal is still an ugly one: landfill. UPS takes peanuts but not blocks. The only recycling center in Portland that took Styrofoam stopped accepting it in March. Now what? Enter Agilyx – an energy alternative company located in Tigard, OR. Implementing new technology in renewable energy and chemical recycling with a focus on environmental impact; the company broke ground this year on a facility that will convert polystyrene foam (foam cups, packaging materials) into styrene monomer. Reducing to the monomer form allows for global reuse in tons of ways. Fuel, helmets, housing … sky’s the limit. Best part for Portlanders? Consumers can drop off their Styrofoam for free. YAY! I spoke with the folks at Agilyx to confirm the free part and they shared that there are bins available 24/7 at their facility. Make sure your foam has the “6” on it and that it is clean and dry.  If you are a business or have more than a truck load, contact Agilyx  at 503-217-3160 to schedule a drop off time. Click here for map and more info. Not in the PDX area? Visit Home for Foam to find recycling near you. Until manufacturers are mandated to use earth friendly packaging, let’s do our best to dispose of stuff mindfully. Here’s to creative solutions and making Earth a clearer home for everyone.

Photo courtesy of NRWS, Paradise, CA.

What’s Your Art Worth?

artAppraising fine art is not for amateurs. Whether you are considering donating, consigning or bequeathing that Koenig, knowing its value is the first step to take. Unless you live in Europe or on the East Coast, qualified art appraisers are a rare breed these days. That’s why I am especially delighted to introduce Chelsea Dacres-Andrews, Certified Fine Arts Appraiser and owner of Signature Appraisal Services. Not only does Chelsea have a list of credentials a mile long but she is super nice and approachable. A breath of fresh air in what can be a stuffy arena. Depending on the need, clients can request either the full 25-page appraisal or the 5-page POV (Professional Opinion of Value). 90% of appraisals can be handled remotely so distance is not an obstacle. Other services offered include expert witness for litigations, public lectures and auction advisory. Learn more and contact Chelsea at her website.